Thursday, May 25, 2017

More About Rev. King

Rev. LINDSAY G. KING
A short biography (as of January 9, 2010)

OVERVIEW:

From a statistical perspective, the probability of Lindsay King extending his education beyond grade eight was quite remote. He was born at the
beginning of the Great Depression. It was at a time when the government
of
Newfoundland
had declared bankruptcy and reduced its budget for education by fifty
percent. To make matters worse, both of his parents died before he
attained the age of fourteen. None of his older siblings got the
opportunity to
obtain any kind of education.

Despite almost formidable obstacles, Lindsay got his basic early grades and completed grades seven and eight in one year at the top of his class.
In addition, his principal permitted him to advance from grade eight to
grade ten. He completed high school at 16
, two years earlier and at the top of his class.

Following a year of gainful employment, which provided him with the funds he needed, he went on to complete a Bachelor of Arts degree at Mount Allison University. In September, 1951, he entered Pine Hill Divinity Hall and graduated with his license to preach. Subsequent to his ordained in 1953 he was assigned to serve his first pastoral charge at Happy Valley, Goosebay, Labrador. What would have a discouraging experience for many newly ordained ministers because a remarkable opportunity for Lindsay that set the tone for a highly creative ministry that has lasted over half of a century.

During his time at Goosebay, he found a community divided against itself and in a stressful and divisive state. He went on to establish a new and successful union church made up of three denominations. In addition, while his wife Jean, took on the task of teaching fifty-two children, Lindsay set about to finishing the construction of a manse, started the construction of a new church building and established a community council. This council laid the foundation of what later became a new municipal council with the first elected mayor of the new municipality.

This successful adventure helped qualify Lindsay for a scholarship to Boston University. He completed a Master's degree in Systematic Theology in 1955. Following post graduate studies he moved to his second pastorate at Tide Head, New Brunswick, a four-point charge near Campbellton, N.B. There he was faced with the huge task of redeveloping all church properties, including the manse. At Tide Head, the central point on the Restigouche Charge, he prepared the architectural drawings and the plans for and supervised the construction of a new church building. It was a substantial all-brick structure in the centre of the community next to the school.

Lindsay then spent three years in Pointe Claire, Quebec, five years in Scarborough and then he moved to Willowdale United Church, now North Toronto, where he served for twenty seven years. It became another unique experience. He saw a congregation go thru three stages: First it was a sleepy bed-room community. Then it became a busy and developing suburb. Thirdly it became a down-town situation developed with a subway, residential high-rise buildings and business towers.

During his years in Willowdale he helped the congregation grow substantially in membership and attendance at weekly worship services doubled. In addition, many people were attracted by an innovative meditation program and his approach to holistic healing in cooperation with medical doctors. A lay leader was
appointed and special service and weekly programs flourished which
attracted people, of all and no denominations from far and wide. This
went on
throughout his ministry at Willowdale.

Since retirement, he prefers to call it re-directment, he has developed an internet ministry. Currently, it is estimated that over 1.5 million people, internationally, are drawn to his online
writings on pneumatology, psychology, religion and healing.

Lindsay is also an accomplished artist. Over 300 of his paintings exist, some of which have a spiritual theme. A most major work of art of his is a wall painting at Willowdale United Church. It depicts The Evolution of Consciousness from creation until now. It covers approximately 1,600 square feet of wall space and has won critical acclaim. It was accomplished, with the help of another artist, over a six-year period.

REMEMBERING “BIG NICK”

Asked how he got his assignment to Happy Valley Lindsay said: “It was Saturday, June 13, 1953. Ordination Sunday and was the following day. He had just finished lunch in the cafeteria of Truman House. As he was about to leave he heard a booming voice from across the room. His friends and he recognized the tall figure of Dr. Clarence M. Nicholson, Principal at Pine Hill and Professor of Theology. He was also serving as Moderator of the United Church of Canada.

Big Nick as he as known spoke loud and clear. 'Lindsay' he said, 'I have been looking for you'. As he approached, Lindsay feared that his ordination was being cancelled. Then he announced I have been to your home province of Newfoundland for a few days. I visited and spoke to your Conference. Of course they knew of your choice to be ordained here and gave their approval. However, they still have the right to decide where you will go on your first assignment. He reached for the letter in his pocket he said, 'This was given to me by the Chair of the Settlement Committee. The letter informed Lindsay that his first appointment was at Goosebay, Labrador. Lindsay had never been to Labrador and did not know what to expect. A HAM radio conversation with a church representative in Labrador provided Lindsay with an idealistic picture. Upon arrival Lindsay found that the actual situation was totally different to the point that he and his wife did not have a place to live in and the church building was a tarred paper shack.

EDUCATION:

With encouragement and help from his older siblings, especially his oldest brother, who never went beyond grade three, Lindsay took his early education at the United Church School on the Belle Island. Although he did not get to grade one until he was eight years old, he was able to finish high school when he was sixteen. How he did this makes for an interesting story.

After a year of work, first in a grocery store and then as a labourer for the Dominion Iron and Steel iron ore mines, he saved enough money to enter Mount Allison University in September of 1947. He graduated with his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1951. In September of that year he entered the United Church seminary, Pine Hill Divinity Hall, now part of .Atlantic School of Theology, in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

While at Pine Hill in 1952 Lindsay married Jean Turner (Mount Allison class of 1950). The following year Lindsay was ordained on behalf of the Newfoundland and Labrador Conference, at Sackville, New Brunswick.

HIS CAREER as an ORDAINED MINISTER:

As indicated above, his career as a minister of the United Church of Canada for over 40 years began in 1953 when he was assigned to be the first charge in Labrador. It was a squatters' town of about 115 families. Before his arrival, Happy Valley was part of the Labrador Mission of the United Church of Canada. It was served by The Rev. Dr. Lester Burry. He saw the need for help in expanding the mission to Labrador. Interestingly, in 1946, Dr. Burry served on the commission which helped bring about Newfoundland's become Canada's tenth province.

MORE ON EDUCATION, HOLISTIC HEALTH OF BODY, MIND AND SPIRIT RE-DISCOVERING THE PHILOSOPHY OF PNEUMATOLOGY IN 1964

Looking back, Lindsay recalls that he took the first step in his journey of what he later discovered was called the philosophy of pneumatology when came out of his own self-consciousness when he came to the discovery of his personal spirit (pneuma); when he became aware of being aware, and that he was an individual apart from his parents, his siblings and others. Since then he became very curious about what it means to be a human being.

THE MIRACLE OF RADIO:

In 1936 the Kings got their first Marconi radio. For Lindsay, the radio opened up a magical world filled with music, news and stories, sports events and the voices of very entertaining and
interesting people from as far away as St. John's, Boston and New York
. It was a treat for Lindsay when by radio he could listen to a church service and other programs from St. John's on Sundays. Even at a young age he found the Bible reading, stories from the Bible, even the preaching interesting. He could hardly wait to get old enough to be able to read the Bible, one of the few books his family had.

THE BEGINNING OF HIS SERIOUS SEARCH FOR PNEUMATOLOGY

Lindsays search for pneumatology began in earnest when he became a freshman and a theological student at Mount Allison University in 1947. He was always interested in science and religion. There he met the newly-appointed faculty adviser, the Rev. Arthur Ebbutt. During the process of completing his doctorate in theology, he was also in charge of the about sixty theological students. Lindsay found him to be a theologian with a very rational and open kind of mind. "When you come into my classes" he was fond of saying, "I do not want
you to leave your brains where you hang your hat." This
gave Lindsay the opportunity to take a scientific attitude and approach to all religious studies. From then on he read everything he could find on psychology, philosophy, religion and the total health of body, mind and spirit. His adviser frequently pointed out that Jesus told his followers not just to preach but to teach and heal. This is the pattern, the rational integration of philosophy, psychology and theology, and their role in helping us to enjoy total health, which Lindsay followed all through university and for all his forty years of pastoral ministry and on into what he now refers to as re-directment.

As already indicated, he was ordained to the ministry of "preaching, teaching and the cure of souls". Interestingly in Happy Valley, there was a Grenfell Mission Nursing Station. As if to fit in with his interest in health, he and his wife lived next door to it. They had a very good working relationship with the two nurses who performed excellent work. To make a long story short, the rich experience of that year inspired him to pursue post-graduate studies in theology at Boston University.

1953-1954 WAS A PIVOTAL YEAR FOR REV. KING:

Under the guidance of faculty from Boston University, Harvard and Union Theological Seminary, NY, Lindsay pursued a course of studies based on the general theme: THE HISTORY OF IDEAS--physically, mentally and spiritual. He wanted to know: How come we believe what we believe and behave as we do? What he learned led him to take a definite and scientific approach to spirituality and religion, including the integration of philosophy, psychology and theology. It laid the foundation for the remainder of his ministry to which he devoted much of his time advocating the practical value of the holistic approach to physical, mental and spiritual health.

Lindsay was Influenced by his studies of the writings of Harry Emerson Fosdick, Norman Vincent Peale (The Power of Positive Thinking, 1952) Leslie D. Weatherhead (Psychology,
Religion and Healing), the writings of the Harvard psychologist,
William James, the Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Jung, Milton Erickson,
Norman Cousins (a psychiatrist and hypnotist) and others. This inspired Lindsay to preach several series of sermons on psychology, religion and the healing. He also talked about the healing ministry of Jesus and his influence on the churches down through the ages. As a result of this, an increasing number of people began to request time with him. He taught people how to stop destroying themselves and start healing themselves.

CATHERINE LIFE-THREATENING ILLNESS:

In 1963 after his daughter had a series of lung problems he used what he called pneumatherapy spiritual use of hypnotic technique. It enabled Lindsay to help her heal herself from within.

1963-1964 WAS, FOR ME, ANOTHER PIVOTAL YEAR

In the spring of 1964 his daughter was on the road to complete recovery from a deadly lung condition. With the help of a mentor and the encouragement of their family doctor, Lindsay applied what the mentor referred to as the "pastoral use of hypnotic technique". Lindsay now refers t it as pneumatherapy. Lindsay recalls that all he did was to encourage his daughter to take personal, or spiritual, responsibility for what was going on in her own mind and body. Rapidly, she became a healthy child and was
never bed-ridden again.

Lindsays Biblical and theological training; the influence of the mentor who taught him the pastoral use of hypnosis, and a book he read, Prayer Can Change Your Life (1957), by a spiritual-minded psychologist, William R. Parker and writer, Elaine St. Johns, influenced him to call what he was doing, PRAYER THERAPY. Encouraged by several members of his congregation he delivered a series of lectures under this title.

PNEUMATOLOGY—The Study of all Things Spiritual

The term 'pneumatology' came later. Putting spirit (pneuma) first, Lindsay began offering a series of lectures on the relationship of psychology, religion and healing and to explore how of faith, hope and love can affect the human but animal-like mind (psyche) and body (soma).

In keeping with his explorations at the time, he felt the need to create a new word specifically related to the study of matters having to do with the human spirit. Thus, based on his knowledge of ancient and New Testament Greek, Lindsay concocted the word 'pneumatology' to which he gave the meaning: the study of the spirit. At the time he was unaware that this word was in the larger dictionaries. Shortly thereafter, he found
it in World Book Dictionary, which defines it as a branch of theology
having to do with doctrines about the Holy Spirit and about spiritual
beings.
The World Book Dictionary further states that in the 1600s it was considered a branch of metaphysics.

PANENTHEISM, HOLOTHEISM AND UNITHEISM

Inspired by idea of pneumatology, Lindsay has been working on an approach to theology which he prefers to call holo-unitheism. Instead of using the noun, God, which has the implication of making god into a human-like and masculine being, he chooses to use any one of the following acronyms: GOD, GØD, or G0D—note the zero '0' What does that acronym stand for?


The G--and this is just his opinion--stands for the actual and potential Good in all things, physical, mental and spiritual. Ø, in his opinion, stands for the Order of things as explored by the sciences. In a non-science sense, one could just use O, 0. Interestingly, the symbol came to his mind in 2005, before he was told by a fellow pastor at a science forum that it is a mathematical symbol called the null. He discovered that ? means the set with no elements. { } means the same thing. He assumed it to be like the point in calculus; it has no dimensions.

The great inventor Nicola Tesla, who wrote about religion, said, "God has no properties." A Google search may lead one to findthat Tesla was a very spiritually-minded scientist who, with his invention of AC electricity, gave us the technology as to how to put
hydro power to practical use.
Tesla was
the son of an Orthodox priest and also said that Christianity and
Buddhism, put together, would make for the best philosophy of religion.
D, stands for all that we find Desirable, the beautiful, the true and the well-designed. When
push comes to shove, do not all humane people, even if they call
themselves atheists, want a universe filled with Goodness, Order and
that which is Desirable?
In Lindsays view, GOD, GØD, or G0D represents too large a hypothesis, or concept, to be contained in even a proper noun. For him it avoids the danger of anthropomorphism, the tendency to create a god in our own image.

When Lindsay thinks of GØD as the one idea behind all that is, he can think as a theist; when he thinks of GØD as the point or unit of all things, he thinks as a unitheist; when he thinks of GØD as the whole, which contains and interpenetrates all things, he thinks as a holotheist. It is possible that guided by the love principle, to see GØD in all things: as do the polytheists. After all, as Bible scholars inform us: Moses was actually a henotheist--My God (YAHWEH) can beat up on your god.


REALITY, EXCEPT IN THE ABSOLUTE SENSE OF THE WORD, IS NOT JUST ONE THING, IT IS A COMPLEX

Lindsay likes the theory which says that every single living creature, with any level of consciousness, including human beings, animals and insects are
constantly creating holograms of what they perceive reality to be. And,
especially for human beings, it can happen moment by moment. Even
those who
live together in families, or as husband and wife, do not perceive of
things--physical, mental or spiritual--in exactly the same way. Perhaps
humans Lindsay suggests, are incapable to perceiving the absolute--GØD. Lindsay finds that the process philosophy and theology of Alfred North Whitehead is very helpful in understanding the idea that we, including what we call God, are all in the process of becoming ad infinitum.

Perhaps there are those of us who need a mother, a child, a lover, or just a friend. This why Lindsay feels it is highly important for us to be careful not to impose our holograms on others. Lindsay suggests that some of us want a god who lords it over us; one who judges us and forgives our sins when we repent and bow before him; some make things, power,
property, fame and wealth into gods, and some of us even makes
ourselves into a god who has all the answers, even when we are not sure
what they are.
He further suggests that some
very creative people are so good at hologram thinking that we think of
them as having illusions and being deluded, even insane. They think of
themselves as philosophers, scientists, artists, geniuses, or even
clergy mediators of the power and love of God.

THE SO-CALLED FAITH-HEALERS?

Please do not confuse the approach which Lindsay took, and still takes, with that of people like the so-called faith-healers like: Oral Roberts, Catherine Kuhlman, Benny Hinn, Peter Youngren and the like. He includes those who believe in what is called Christian Science. He suggests that through experience that beliefs and faith can have a powerful effect on total health. However, Lindsay has never been a fan of blind faith. As a columnist for a paper over a number of years, he took the opportunity to investigate, close up the claims and results of several "faith" healers.

ONE SO-CALLED FAITH-HEALER EVEN CLAIMED: "GOD WILL FILL TEETH, WITH GOLD."

One so-called faith healer Lindsay investigated worked exclusively on dental problems. He even claimed that, "God will replace the amalgam fillings in teeth with gold fillings. Sometimes God will
even replace missing teeth." The news media gave this story all kinds
of a laced-with-skepticism kind of coverage. Naturally, it attracted
the curious, along with the faithful. One evening
Lindsay attended one of the demonstrations. Following the "healing" service and demonstration, Lindsay interviewed
one who was told, by the "healer": "You now have all gold fillings in
your teeth, not the amalgams with which you came."
Lindsay asked her: "Do you really believe what you were told?" Obviously a "believer" she invited him to look, for himself. He replied that the lighting was not conducive for him to verify he ladys your claim. He suggested that she check with her dentist to which she agreed. Lindsay suggests that if we can come up with the evidence, he is a strong believer in concrete evidence, that if one can now have gold and not amalgam fillings, he would do all he could to promote the story. Lindsay heard nothing back from anyone, including the lady or her dentist. He concluded that
the claims were fraudulent. The "subject" believed what she was told by
the "faith healer" because she was in a hypnotic trance at the time.
That was the first and last time he heard about this magical approach to dentistry. Obviously, the claim had no validity.

LINDSAYS APPROACH TO FAITH

Rather than asking people to take a blind leap into the darkness, Lindsay prefers to ask them to take a careful walk in the light available to them. In his search for a rational approach to "faith healing" he was greatly influenced by the very well-researched and controversial book Psychology, Religion and Healing by the minister and psychologist, Dr. Leslie D. Weatherhead of London, England.

Sampling of CONTENTS:

SUMMARY: FOREWORD BY THE REV. DR. ERIC S. WATERHOUSE & BY DR. GEOFFREY EVANS.

PREFACE. INTRODUCTION-MAN'S EARLIEST SEARCH FOR HEALING.

SECTION ONE - EARLIER METHODS OF HEALING THROUGH RELIGION.

I. CHRIST'S HEALING MIRACLES.

II. HEALING IN THE EARLY CHURCH.

III. THE PROBLEM OF DEMON POSSESSION. SECTION TWO - EARLIER METHODS OF HEALING THROUGH PSYCHOLOGY.

SECTION THREE - MODERN METHODS OF HEALING THROUGH RELIGION.

I. THE LAYING ON OF HANDS.

II. THE PHENOMENA OF LOURDES.

III. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE.

IV. HEALING MISSIONS.

V. PSYCHIC PHENOMENA AND HEALING.

VI. OTHER RELIGIOUS HEALING MOVEMENTS.

VII. THE PRACTICE OF INTERCESSION.

SECTION FOUR - MODERN METHODS OF HEALING THROUGH PSYCHOLOGY. I - VI.,

SECTION FIVE. DO MODERN PSYCHOLOGICAL METHODS OF HEALING NEED RELIGION? I. - VII.

SECTION SIX. DO MODERN RELIGIOUS METHODS OF HEALING NEED PSYCHOLOGY? I - III.

SECTION SEVEN - THE MODERN SEARCH FOR HEALING THROUGH PSYCHOLOGY AND RELIGION.

I - IV.

HYPNOTISM

Lindsay was impressed by the fact that the minister and psychologist, Dr. Leslie D. Weatherhead took an interest in the phenomenon of hypnotism. While
hypnotic-like phenomena are mentioned in ancient Greek and Egyptian
papyri it is generally agree that all modern hypnotism stems from the
work of the physician, a graduate (1766) of the
University of Vienna, Franz Anton Mesmer. From his name we get our verb to mesmerize. He called the phenomenon, animal magnetism. When Lindsay came to the chapter on "hypnotism" he was fascinated by the phenomenon. He decided to make an effort to understand what it was and to learn how to use it. The more he looked into it the more he was amazed at the simplicity of it and at how natural it is. He discovered that it was a natural phenomenon.

Lindsay explains that it is not unlike the way a child learns to walk, run, talk, sing and play. As children grow, physically, mentally and spiritually, with the help of wise parents and teachers, willing to risk giving children as much freedom as possible, they can learn to become masters in any field or fields they happen to choose. The making of choices is what Lindsay calls a pneumatological, a spiritual and freedom-based-phenomenon.


A NAME THAT STANDS OUT, WEATHERHEAD

During the period after the Second World War, in which English Protestant non-conformity declined rapidly, a handful of exceptional names stand
out, and one of the most remarkable was that of the Methodist minister
Leslie Dixon Weatherhead. Both through his ministry at the
City Temple, in the heart of London,
and more generally through the massive sales of his books, Dr.
Weatherhead became a dominant figure, with an influence far beyond the
British Isles.

The City Temple, a Congregationalist church, was widely seen at the time as the greatest English Free Church pulpit. It ensured him a wide audience, while the quality of his preaching, combining emotional and intellectual power, wit and eloquence, won him admirers
among all the churches
. It led
to offers from a number of American and Canadian universities and
congregations, as well as numerous honorary degrees from British and
American universities. Despite his Congregationalist call, he remained
a Methodist minister, and indeed became President of the Methodist
Conference. Perhaps even more important was that he was one of the
earliest to recognize the value of the applications for the clergy of
the insights of Freud and Jung.

His seventy-odd publications, of which, The Christian Agnostic, and, Psychology Religion and Healing, were the most influential. They bring
out not only the theological liberalism that made him suspect in some
circles, but also his understanding of the value of healing and of
psychological insights. The result was that his 'lay theology' had a
vast following. Although three other books have appeared about
Weatherhead since his death, PNEUMA, PSYCHE, SOMA--SPIRIT, MIND,
BODY--components, or essential parts, of human nature

PNEUMATOLOGY

Lindsay proposed: "Why do people use the word 'pneumatological?"

His response is because it refers specifically to the human spirit (pneuma). That is the spirit as distinct from our animal-like minds. We call ourselves 'human', thinking and self-conscious beings.

PSYCHOLOGY

When asked,"Why not 'psychological'--having to do with the mind, which is usually associated with the brain?"

Lindsays response is because he has some basic training in philosophy and psychology, he uses it especially when he wants to refer to what people have in common with animal beings. Before psychology broke away from its mother, philosophy, it was called 'pneumatology'--meaning study of the spirit. It is also interesting that it was Wilhelm Wundt, the son of an evangelical Lutheran minister, who, in 1879, in Leipzig, Germany, set up the first laborarory. His findings led the development of the school behaviourism and a new emphasis on physicalism. Much controversy
broke out.

SOMATOLOGY

Lindsay also uses 'somatological'--having to do with the body, including the brain. The brain is a physical organ. But we need to ask: Is it confined just to the head?The latest research seems to indicate that our mind/brain has a kind of wireless connection with much more than just our immediate environment. In Lindsays view, the spirit component, an essential part of our human nature, craves more and more freedom from the limitations of the mind and the body. This poses several important questions which he addresses to himself:

What kind of spirit am I? Am I a spirit who wants to make good choices? Or am I driven by my ego and unconscious drives to make ones that are not so good, even painful and evil ones? How free am I, really?


FREEDOM OF THE SPIRIT

Lindsay suggests, howfree am I to say that I have the freedom of will to make this choice, or that. I would like to feel that I am, and will be, what I choose
freely choose to be. Therefore, I choose freely the good, to lovingly
discipline my mind and body, as I would my children, to come along. In
other words, I choose to be at one with Spirit, Life, Love, all Being,
GOD
, the
Spirit of goodness, order and design in and through all that is. Can I
not do this without even using the acronym 'GOD' or the noun 'God'?

Lindsay believes that one of the basic tools of the Spirit is imagination, the ability to visualize what is good, or evil. Je suggests that from his perspective, he has the power to use his will and imagination for good, or evil. He can say yes, or no, to Life and Being. If he chooses to do nothing, he can choose to do evil. One cannot be neutral. He believes that on their own, the mind and the body, like stubborn children, tend to resist the change necessary to get this freedom and to live as
spiritually attuned adults.

BACK TO BRAID

Back to learning how to use the phenomenon, which Dr. James Braid admitted he misnamed "hypnosis". He tried to change "hypnotism" to "monoideism", the ability to focus on and imagine one idea.

As Lindsay studied the history of what Braid, Mesmer--Mesmer called what Braid called "hypnosis" "animal magnetism"--and others before them had discovered, he soon discovered that, in modern times, it is surrounded by all kinds of myths perpetrated by the media and fiction. In the Far East it was known as "yoga".

MOVIES AND MYTHS—EVEN FALSE ONES

Not all myths he suggests are false but, for example, the novel, Trilby, which was written in 1894 by George du Maurier, is filled with a FALSE myth. In 1931, when John Barrymore played the role of the manipulative hypnotist Svengali, in a movie based on the book, the myth was spread to all who
saw it. It spread all kinds of false concepts about the "power" of
hypnotists.
The fact is he suggests is that hypnotists have only the power which subjects, using their imagination in an unconsciously and negative way, give them.

THE MASTER-SUBJECT MYTH

The fact is: all hypnosis is self-hypnosis. Lindsay suggests that it is up to us whether or not we become subjects or partners in a health-producing partnership.

INTRODUCING MILTON H. ERICKSON

Lindsay suggests that Erickson was more of what he callsa pneumatherapist than he was a hypnotist. He led his clients to take control into their own hands and not have to depend on a master from
outside.

THIS IS INTERESTING AND CONTROVERSIAL

AND MAXWELL MALTZ

It was back in the 1970's that Lindsay first read [color=#ff0000]PSYCHO-CYBERNETICS, A New Way to GET MORE LIVING OUT OF LIFE (Prentice Hall, 1960).[/color]. Not long before his death, he had the pleasure of meeting the author, Dr. Maxwell Maltz , a plastic surgeon by profession. Following a very interesting lecture Lindsay got the opportunity to tell him about his interest in the integrative approach to total health of body, mind and spirit. He informed him about what he then began calling pneumatology, the study of spirituality. Spirit (Pneuma), as he understands it, it is what, Echart Tolle describes in his book, The power of the NOW--calls the Un-manifested Source of all that IS--physically and mentally. He informed Dr. Maltz that even as a student minister he had the feeling that he was not in the ministry just to preach, to declare the basic principles of living the good life, but also to teach about health and help people heal themselves. He was interested in helping people be the kind of spirit-filled people we all want to be, in the NOW. Lindsay was not into converting anyone to any absolute form of religion dominated by fixed-position thinking, the kind of religion which promises, 'pie in the sky, by and by, when you die', if followers agree to obey self-appointed religious hierarchy,
pray to a god as defined by this hierarchy and pay what is demanded of
them.
Lindsay showed Dr. Maltz a written outline of the lecture series which he started giving in 1964 under the general heading PRAYER THERAPY. Later, he used the term PNEUMATOLOGY, the study of all things spiritual. After he viewed the outline his words to Lindsay were highly encouraging. Lindsay urged his pneumatology students to read Dr. Maltz's book, Psycho-Cybernetics. His book is more about what Lindsay refers to as Pneuma-Cybernetics.

However, Lindsay has not retired from ministering to the larger community. Following the tradition of the 18th Century reformer, John Wesley, the founder of
Methodism
, has always thought of the role of the church as that of serving the whole community, not just its members. Lindsay, like Wesley believes that "The world [is his] parish".

FEATHERS—NEITHER A LEFT NOR RIGHT-WING—APPROACH TO ECONOMICS

Lindsay is also deeply interested in the role that politics and economics play in all our lives, and how they can be used to provide health, wealth,
justice and peace for all people, of all races and creeds, who live on
planet earth.
In 1993 he ran for election to the federal parliament. In 1994 he ran for mayor of the Town of Markham. In 2004 he ran provincially for the Freedom Party.

CHURCH ON THE WEB:

Lindsay is now the volunteer director and office manager of the Family Life Foundation, a registered charity which he helped found in 1973. The Family Life Foundation offers counseling, education and weekly discussion groups in the local community and in its on-line forum site.

Similar to what he did when he was a parish minister, the Family Life Foundation is dedicated to the promotion of the HOLISTIC, physical, mental and spiritual, approach to health and prosperity, for all. As part of this approach, since the early 1960s Lindsay has been a strong advocate of the use of local currencies as a way of creating employment for those who find it difficult to compete in the
market place. Local currency advocates favour the free market approach.
It can be demonstrated that local currencies help make the market truly
free.
Details may be viewed at www.flfcanada.com It is fully interactive and growing.


UNITHEISM

"The Rev"—referring to his 'revolutionary' and non-status quo way of thinking, is a life-long student of philosophy and psychology, his
undergrad major. He believes that there need be no conflict between
good science and healthy religion
, one rooted in sighted faith and reason.

Theologically speaking, in the 1980s, he began preaching and writing about what he called "unitheism". Later, he discovered that others are now using the
same word and that it is not unlike the kind of panentheism, the theme
of Professor Marcus Borg's book, THE GOD WE NEVER KNEW
, Beyond Dogmatic Religion to a More authentic Faith (1997). Lindsay advises that Unitheism is a way of thinking about God, or the Holy Spirit, as that great mystery, immanent and transcendent being, which is total, universal and all encompassing. This ineffable Spirit he explains, surrounds and permeates that we
call the natural and material universe. To indicate that unitheism
differs from pantheism, deism, monotheism, and to avoid
anthropomorphisms, the Rev likes to use the Orthodox Jewish way of
spelling the divine name: G-d.

FAMILY

Lindsay and his wife Jean have a son Turner who is a professional musician and school teacher. He and his wife Farah are the parents of three Neda, Sahar and Tyler. Their daughter Catherine is an accomplished artist who lives with her artist husband Wayne in British Columbia.

 

SEPTEMBER 1947 AND BEYOND

LGK started his undergarduate studies in 1947 at Mount Allison University, in New Brunswick.

After he completed his studies at Mount Allison University (Class of 1951), (Sackville, NB) http://www.mta.ca and at Pine Hill Divinity Hall--now called the Atlantic School of Theology, Halifax, NS, he was ordained in June, 1953, at 23.

THE FIRST ASSIGNMENT
The Rev. King met his wife, Jean Turner (teacher) of Hartland, NB, when they were both students at MTA. They married in 1952, at Bible Hill, NS, when he was the student minister there. In June of 1953, they were assigned to Happy Valley--then a squatters' town near the Goose Bay air base in Labrador. Using Maritime Central Airways, Lindsay and Jean wife, and a kitten, Holy, took their first commercial flight in a DC 3 from Moncton, NB, July 18, 1953 and landed, around noon, at Goose Bay. It was a beautiful, warm and clear day. There, they were xxxxx About what we found. more will be added here.

THE FIRST COUNCIL.
In the area, there were about 25 Anglican families, 25 Moravian families, 50 United Church families and 15 Pentecostal families. New families were moving in every week.

The council quickly came to the conclusion, and a motion was passed, that the authorities --the Base and government authorities--be approached with a view to having the area become a municipality, in the near future. This was accomplished in 1961.
HAPPY VALLEY GOOSE BAY TODAY 2010
http://www.happyvalley-goosebay.com/home/profile.htm

All his ministry he had been an advocate of the holistic approach to the human predicament. This includes his emphasis on complementary solutions, including the use of complementary medicine for health problems and complementary community currencies for dealing with the problem of poverty. Details about this work can be found at his site at http://www.flfcanada.com the site of a registered charity he founded in 1973.

POST GRADUATE STUDIES IN BOSTON
In the Spring of 1954, the Rev. King was awarded a two-year scholarship to do post graduate studies at Boston University. Some of his professors were from Harvard and Union Theological Seminary, New York. At the end of June, 1954, the Kings left Happy Valley so that he could take up his studies that fall. Completing his masters on the theme "THE HISTORY OF IDEAS" he returned to Canada. He served three years in Tide Head, N.B., where he led the congregation in the building a new church, extensive repairs were done to the manse, and there was extensive re-development of the other churches on the four-point charge. Follow this, he served three years in Pointe Claire, Quebec, five years in Scarborough and twenty seven years in Willowdale, where he retired.

THE BASIS OF SPIRITUAL HEALING
In Willowdale, he did pioneering work in pneumatology (the mother of psychology) and introduced the idea of pneumatherapy--the pastoral use of hypnotic technique--the basis of spiritual healing, which is commonly called "faith" healing. At the time this was quite controversial. There was actually a law preventing anyone without and M.D. from using hypnosis. King's work help change this silly law. Preferring to wear out, not rust out, in retirement he is serving as the volunteer CEO of the Family Life Foundation, which is dedicated to community building, the promotion of holistic health and prosperity.

The Kings have a daughter, Catherine (1956)--an artist and a drugless therapist. She and her artist husband, Wayne Adams, live on floating house, near Tofino, B.C. In 1994, the year both Lindsay and Jean retired, after visiting, visiting his family in Newfoundland, they made their first visit to the floating house. At the time, there was only a single-story house with just enough room for four.

The Kings also have a son, Turner (1958). He is a musician (the woodwinds) and a teacher. He and Farah--they met when they were both students at York University--born in Terhan, Iran, are the proud parents of Neda (1988), Sahar (1991) and Tyler. (1995).